The Wapshott Press is now a 501(c)(3) nonprofit. Please donate to the Wapshott Press Thank you so much for your support. All donations are tax deductible.

A year goes by awfully fast, doesn’t it?

2018 Wapshott Press Fundraiser!

Donations can be made at www.WapshottPress.net. The PayPal Giving fund charges us no fees on your donation. And between Giving Tuesday (11/27/2018) and New Year’s Eve, the Giving Fund will add 1% to every donation. That might not seem like much, but the Wapshott Press gets three dimes out of every quarter, so we make it go far. Perks: All donations receive a pdf of the book of your choice; Donations over $100 receive the pdf and a print copy of the book of your choice (can be different books); Over $200 the pdf and 2 copies; Over $300 the pdf and 3 copies; Over $350 the pdf and a full subscription to everything below; Over $500 your own custom half dozen of anything we’ve ever published.

Wapshott Press 2018 Fundraiser for Storylandia and Poetrylandia fiction and poetry collections. Please be generous; we need you. Thank you.

But first, an enormous thank you to our supporters, the Friends of the Wapshott Press:

Steve Kasten and Nancy Garcia of Steve Kasten Properties, Muna Deraine, Rachel Livingston of Furies Publishing, KM Warner, Kathryn L. Ramage, Jim and Rebecca Wright, Jennifer Bentson of Jennifer Bentson Arts, Debbie Jones and Steve Acker, Ann Siemens, Suzanne Siegel, Richard Whittaker of Works+Conversations magazine, Carol Colin and Ted Waltz, and several supporters who wish to remain anonymous.

What we did in this year with your generous donations from last year:


(click on the images for more information)

Donations can be made at www.WapshottPress.net

What we plan to do in 2019 with your generous donations from this year:

Storylandia, Issue 28, Winter 2019
Make me Disappear, by Jennifer Wilson
Mabel Banner, age fifteen, is a girl on the run. Escaping a dark and tumultuous life in the foster care system in Oklahoma, she runs to Key West, where she becomes first mate on board the sailboat Stella Luna, with the amiable Jake Ennis as captain. In Florida she forges a new life with a new name and tries to forget the circumstances that brought her there. But can Mabel keep her past a secret from Jake? Will the authorities looking for her eventually catch up? And mostly, will she ever have a chance at a normal life? Mabel finds that no matter how hard she tries, she can’t outrun the ghosts that haunt her dreams and the feeling that, eventually, everything she has fought so hard to gain will slip out from between her fingers like the sugar white sand of a Gulf Coast beach. (excerpt below)

Jennifer Wilson lives in Texas with her husband and ten of her thirteen children. When she is not negotiating peace treaties between the warring factions residing beneath her roof, she enjoys writing and playing the banjo. Occasionally she hides in the closet and drinks whiskey while contemplating the meaning of the universe. She has published four books of poetry and two novels, blogs at crazyreal.net.

Donations can be made at www.WapshottPress.net

Storylandia, Issue 29, Spring 2018
Crime Spree and Other Stories, by Thomas Larsen
From journeyman printer to small-time crook, pothead senior to retired nun, Tom Larsen has captured a wide range of life experiences in theses self-contained stories. This collection is an homage to the random fortunes of the baby boom. Whether set in the inner city, suburbia or the northwest coast, Larsen’s colorful cast confirms he knows of what he speaks. (excerpt below)

Tom Larsen lives in the Pennsport section of South Philadelphia, home to Mummers, Flyers and that screw you slant that made the city great. He and his wife lived in Pennsport for a decade in the 90’s then moved away, then moved back again. Where the heart is, yo. For a writer auditioning characters, the 19148 zip is a casting gold mine.

Donations can be made at www.WapshottPress.net

Poetrylandia, Issue 1 (our first volume of poetry!)
Required Silence, by Dawn Cunningham
Women go through a particular silence which has been a requirement in society for generations. This required silence is a cause of struggles in a woman’s survival. The silence is hard to overcome—if a woman ever overcomes it. Ridding the silence is a continuous fight even after a woman finds a way to overcome. (excerpt below)

Dawn Cunningham grew up listening to her grandmother’s stories of the family, which led Ms. Cunningham to write her stories, mostly in poetry. At a young age, she fell in love with Edgar Allen Poe’s stories and poems. Then in her college years, she came to love surrealism—especially Max Ernst and Salvador Dali. She shares her love of literature and arts with her four children, thirteen grandchildren (and, soon, another grandchild), and with her partner, Christopher.

Donations can be made at www.WapshottPress.net

Storylandia, Issue 30, Summer 2019
Letters to S, by George Gad Economou
A love story that challenges beliefs, lifestyles, and desires.
He searches for a replacement to his greatest love (whom he lost way too soon to reasons better left untold); she seeks for a safe harbor to shelter her from her tumultuous relationship that rapidly reaches its end. Passion and lust are born the moment they lay eyes on each other; however, their story quickly turns into a tale of brutal irony and of obstacles that cannot be overcome. (excerpt below)

George Gad Economou, born in 1990 in Athens, Greece, has a Master’s in Philosophy of Science from Aarhus University and is currently residing in Athens, working as a freelance writer. His stories have appeared in various online outlets, such as Spillwords and Jumbelbook.

Storylandia, Issue 31, Autumn 2019
The Beasthood, by Dawn Cunningham
Deloris Jaguer is assigned to investigate The Beasthood which many women declare exists. In her search—through various evidence presented—to find the truth, she discovers more about herself and the literal meaning of The Beasthood. (excerpt below)

See Poetrylandia 1 for Dawn’s bio.

2018 Wapshott Press Fundraiser! Donations can be made at www.WapshottPress.net. The PayPal Giving fund charges us no fees on your donation. And between Giving Tuesday (11/27/2018) and New Year’s Eve, the Giving Fund will add 1% to every donation. That might not seem like much, but the Wapshott Press gets three dimes out of every quarter, so we make it go far. Perks: All donations receive a pdf of the book of your choice; Donations over $100 receive the pdf and a print copy of the book of your choice (can be different books); Over $200 the pdf and 2 copies; Over $300 the pdf and 3 copies; Over $350 the pdf and a full subscription to everything below; Over $500 your own custom half dozen of anything we’ve ever published.

Click here Continue reading

Oh, and a podcast

In honor of the Wapshott Press annual fundraiser that officially starts on Giving Tuesday, November 27 this year because PayPal Giving Fund will add 1% to every donation, I’ve started a podcast. Here’s the webpage www.WapshottPress.org/2018-fundraiser for the perks, future plans, and the whole lovely story. Also, I’ve started a podcast because I’m told that’s the thing one still does these days. The podcast if called An Editor’s Work is Never Done (ooh, I have 2 followers already!) to help promote all things Wapshott Press, including this fundrasier. I haven’t officially launched it at Wapshott Press, but you, lucky Hackenblog readers, can hear my maiden voyage here at SoundCloud. Well, I guess I can embed the player

J Bloglandia 3-1 The Dark Shadows Issue is now on sale! The wait is over!

Our first Journal of Bloglandia issue in nine years!

The Journal of Bloglandia
The Dark Shadows Issue

“As a little girl in the early ’70s, I would come home from school every day and turn on the TV to watch reruns of what we called ‘Barnabas Collins,’ the show about the vampire.”

And 40 years later, she watched it all again from the very beginning. It started as a brief blog experiment: watch and review the earliest episodes of the 1960s soap opera Dark Shadows before the arrival of vampire Barnabas Collins… but then it kept going. In the end, Kathryn L. Ramage watched the entire series of more than 1200 episodes and wrote about the experience. This book presents the highlights of those reviews.

Where to buy: Amazon (eligible for free shipping). Not available in eBook format.
The Wapshott Press, publisher of Storylandia, is now an Amazon Charity. Yay! So if you could please choose Wapshott Press as your charity when you’re shopping at Amazon, it will help us a lot. Here’s the link to make Wapshott Press your charity, and you only have to register once.


Sample pages

Where to buy: Amazon (eligible for free shipping). Not available in eBook format.

The Wapshott Press, publisher of Storylandia, is now an Amazon Charity. Yay! So if you could please choose Wapshott Press as your charity when you’re shopping at Amazon, it will help us a lot. Here’s the link to make Wapshott Press your charity, and you only have to register once.

Help the Wapshott Press publish books that should be published! The Wapshott Press, publisher of Storylandia, is now a 501(c)(3) nonprofit. Tax deductible donations can be made here: Wapshott Press Donations and thank you so much for your support! (PS. Paypal takes zero commissions from your donation to the Wapshott Press.)

Continue reading

Book Biz News – Cheltenham Literature Fesitval edition

News from the Cheltenham literature festival (or Cheltenham Literature Festival, if I was punctuating this article)

“She (Dolly Alderton) said it was Darcy who first came up with ‘negging’, a phrase which has caught on after being coined by the American writer Neil Strauss in his book The Game: Penetrating The Secret Society of Pick-Up Artists.

“Negging is the act of emotional manipulation whereby a person makes a deliberate backhanded compliment, or flirtatious remark, to undermine someone’s confidence and increase the need for approval.

“So a man might come up to Alderton afterwards and say, ‘Oh, you were quite good because normally women aren’t that funny’.”
Mr Darcy’s reputation as romantic hero trashed at Cheltenham literature festival

Defendez M. Darcy. Or don’t he’s so freaking wealthy and good looking, who cares if he’s a jerk?

Also, Brit punctuation on Mr always throws me for a loop, Ms. American hyper-punctuating savage that I am. See the punctuation on Ms.? Take that Guardian newspaper.

“She (Pat Barker) said fiction, or the reading of fiction, was not in good health. It is less #MeToo, she told the Cheltenham literature festival on Sunday. “It is the so what moment.

“‘Even among very enthusiastic modern readers of fiction there is the “so what” movement where you put down a book and you’ve been entertained by the story of contemporary life or mores, or whatever, and you think, “yes but so what”.'”
‘So what’ fiction isn’t creating passionate readers, says Pat Barker

Well, there are only so many properly punctuating American writers to pen things like “Uncle Tom’s Cabin” or “The Jungle” or “Grapes of Wrath” (alas). Suck it, Brits, until you learn to punctuate like Americans, you’ll just have to whine at someone else. I have semicolons and em dashes to wrangle.

“The literary world is packed with novelists reviewing the books of their colleagues but it is not something Kate Atkinson would do, calling it a ‘callous art’.”
Kate Atkinson calls authors reviewing their peers a ‘callous art’

WHAT IS WRONG WITH YOU PEOPLE OVER THERE? STOP WHINING! American novelists reviewing each other are (is?) hysterically funny. And the best we can get now that Elaine’s is closed and so no many American author fist fights anymore, alas.

I’m never going to the Cheltenham Literature Festival; it would be too traumatic (for everyone).

Please consider a donation to the Wapshott Press nonprofit so we can keep publishing books that should be published. If you feel like saving up for it, PayPal will add 1% to whatever you donate between December 1 and 31, 2018. The Wapshott Press gets 3 nickels out of every dime, so that 1% extra really does make a difference. Expect the unexpected, and these little reminders until the end of the year. Thank you. Your favorite editor, Ginger Mayerson

Book Biz News mini-edition

Patrick O’Brian’s unknown poems discovered in a drawer
What is it with people shoving work into drawers or piano benches? I wonder.

Why we need an award for writers who start later in life
Here, here! Some of us were writing music for 30 years before the writing words thing started.

Censorship Project + A Brief History of Book Burning

“Vistula” Storylandia, Issue 27, Wapshott Press Journal of Fiction NOW ON SALE!

Vistula

Private Johnny Zewiski stands above a polluted river, his hands tied behind his back. It’s a cold afternoon in war-torn Warsaw, Poland. In front of him, beyond the river, smoldering ruins echo the sound of small arms fire. Behind him, a Nazi machine gun crew hastily assembles their weapon, anxious to finish the execution and get back to shelter.

Ex-private, actually. Johnny had deserted his post and fled his Army unit under wartime circumstances, thereby sealing his fate, no matter who took the trouble to capture and put him front of a firing squad. He fled with honorable intentions, he thought, but the war didn’t care about honor.

His only friend, Jakub, another displaced Polish-American, stands next to him, kvetching about unrequited miracles.

Johnny’s journey, from his boyhood home in Allentown, Pennsylvania to Warsaw, is a crazy ride of miraculous encounters. It begins in Tunisia, then across the North Sea, through the heart of Nazi-occupied Poland, and winds up in the arms of the embattled Polish resistance who are desperately trying to defend their capital until the Allied armies can save them from the Nazi onslaught.

He dreams of home while waiting for the bullets to fly; his mother and father who cried while their former homeland turned to rubble, his brothers who warned him not to go near the recruiting station and his girlfriend who followed him in his tortured dreams and begged him to come home.

When the machine gun fires, Johnny’s fate takes yet another turn and he begins a new journey that’s just as dangerous and ill-conceived as the last.

Where to buy: Amazon (eligible for free shipping) and Kindle.
The Wapshott Press, publisher of Storylandia, is now an Amazon Charity. Yay! So if you could please choose Wapshott Press as your charity when you’re shopping at Amazon, it will help us a lot. Here’s the link to make Wapshott Press your charity, and you only have to register once.


Sample pages

Where to buy: Amazon (eligible for free shipping) and Kindle.
The Wapshott Press, publisher of Storylandia, is now an Amazon Charity. Yay! So if you could please choose Wapshott Press as your charity when you’re shopping at Amazon, it will help us a lot. Here’s the link to make Wapshott Press your charity, and you only have to register once.

Help the Wapshott Press publish books that should be published! The Wapshott Press, publisher of Storylandia, is now a 501(c)(3) nonprofit. Tax deductible donations can be made here: Wapshott Press Donations and thank you so much for your support! (PS. Paypal takes zero commissions from your donation to the Wapshott Press.)

Very large excerpt:
Continue reading

An editor’s work is never done

Ah, the things I do for the Wapshott Press… In hopes of bringing our books and journals to more and more worthy readers, I’ve been studying SEO. Yes, me, your beloved editor, Ginger Mayerson, has been learning things I never even knew I wanted to know. Well, there is an upside to all this, in addition to better SEO: I invented a new word that doesn’t seem to be found on Google.

Things the Google spiders and bots like to eat for improved SEO health could be called

BOTNIP or botnip or bot-nip (yes, you got it, like catnip or cat-nip)

Yes. Very much yes. Please, experts in all things, fact-check the hell out of me. I love it.

Thanks, Freddy Tran Nager and his Atomic Tango for getting me hipper to the SEO scene. A painless, useful, information packed session. I feel so much smarter, happier, and better-looking, too.

Book Biz News

French bookshops revolt after prize selects novel self-published on Amazon (quel horreur!)

BBC short story prize selects all-female shortlist for fifth time

2018 National Book Award Longlists Announced

Poem of the week: Aristocrats by Keith Douglas

John Steinbeck was a sadistic womaniser, says wife in memoir

Eleven research funders launch open access initiative

Read and Publish: Is It Good for the Academy?

Reclaiming Reference

Storylandia 26 “Marchers’ Season” is now on Sale!

Where to buy: Amazon (eligible for free shipping) and Kindle.


Sample pages

Where to buy: Amazon (eligible for free shipping) and Kindle.

Marchers’ Season

“As a child in Arkansas in the 1950s, Gray Alsobrook watched his father drive away and abandon his family. So when Gray Alsobrook came home from the Vietnam War as a young man and started his own family with his wife, Doreen, he determined to put down tightly-holding roots in the first town where he got a decent job, even if it was a town with a racially troubled past like Meadowview, Alabama. Almost two decades later, their youngest child, Joe, enters the home-stretch of his senior year of high school. When the town erupts into protest and anger after the school board fires the town’s first African-Amercian schools superintendent and Joe is right in the middle of it all, Gray’s dedication to putting down roots and building a stable life is put to the test.”

Where to buy: Amazon (eligible for free shipping) and Kindle.

Help the Wapshott Press publish books that should be published! The Wapshott Press, publisher of Storylandia, is now a 501(c)(3) nonprofit. Tax deductible donations can be made here: Wapshott Press Donations and thank you so much for your support! (PS. Paypal takes zero commissions from your donation to the Wapshott Press.)

Now on Sale: We are all Falling Towards Centre of the Earth

Where to buy: Amazon (eligible for free shipping) and Kindle.


Sample pages

Where to buy: Amazon (eligible for free shipping) and Kindle.

We are all Falling Towards the Centre of the Earth

Best to put him out of his misery. The Spoiler stepped into view and picked up the knife.
“You can’t touch that! The cops will need it for evidence,” said the man.
The Spoiler winced. She’d never liked a Texan drawl.
“They won’t,” said the Spoiler, “the knife doesn’t exist yet.”
Enjoying the man’s confusion, the Spoiler continued. “It hasn’t been manufactured yet. It will spend some years in a kitchen drawer a few streets away from here. And this is what it’ll look like in eleven years’ time, when it’s been used to cut your throat with.”
He was gawping at her; she was the maniac.
The Spoiler held up her free hand. “Not by me. I don’t kill people. I just bring tidings. Shall I tell you who does kill you?”
It wasn’t really a question; of course she was going to tell him.

The second short story collection from British writer Julie Travis presents nine new tales of horror, dark fantasy and Surrealism. This is where you’ll find the landscape is a living thing, that monuments are built to the future and where Death is just the beginning. Enjoy contemporary fairy tales mingling amongst stories of escape from desperate times and a culture where difference is seen as a blessing, not a threat.

“A feeling akin to sanctity… a reverence for the bleak and wild landscape… a kind of pantheism or Gaia worship. There’s a whiff of writers like Machen or Blackwood, echoes of Barker, a combination of ghost story and folklore.”
Peter Tennant, Black Static

Where to buy: Amazon (eligible for free shipping) and Kindle.

We are all Falling Towards the Centre of the Earth
ISBN: 978-1-942007-18-0

Help the Wapshott Press publish books that should be published! The Wapshott Press, publisher of Storylandia, is now a 501(c)(3) nonprofit. Tax deductible donations can be made here: Wapshott Press Donations and thank you so much for your support! (PS. Paypal takes zero commissions from your donation to the Wapshott Press.)

Now on sale: Issue 25 “Miranda”

Where to buy: Amazon (eligible for free shipping) and Kindle.


Sample pages

Where to buy: Amazon (eligible for free shipping) and Kindle.

Miranda

“The large sitting room of the Rolling Hills Club was empty, save for the flickering candles and the menus that stood like protecting arms around their flames. The tables were covered with empty wine glasses, cocktail glasses, and snifters floating on napkins or abandoned on the side tables. Stray napkin balls sat like cats under the sofas and littered the floor.”

This is the Rolling Hills Club, a place where Philadelphia’s rich—including Miranda Anderson, the socialite who ties the seven stories in Miranda together—come to spend their time and money. From general manager of the club to Miranda’s best frenemy, the other characters in these narratives show what kind of person Miranda is—and what kind of person she might become.

Where to buy: Amazon (eligible for free shipping) and Kindle.

Help the Wapshott Press publish books that should be published! The Wapshott Press, publisher of Storylandia, is now a 501(c)(3) nonprofit. Tax deductible donations can be made here: Wapshott Press Donations and thank you so much for your support! (PS. Paypal takes zero commissions from your donation to the Wapshott Press.)

Bad Medicine: The Picture in the House

By Kathryn L Ramage

The 12th plate from Regnum Congo

“The book fell open, almost of its own accord and as if from frequent consultation at this place, to the repellent twelfth plate shewing a butcher’s shop amongst the Anzique cannibals. My sense of restlessness returned, though I did not exhibit it. The especially bizarre thing was that the artist had made his Africans look like white men—the limbs and quarters hanging about the walls of the shop were ghastly, while the butcher with his axe was hideously incongruous.”

From HP Lovecraft’s The Picture in the House

This third and final segment of the Dark Adventure Radio Theatre audio drama has been stretched to fit into the “Bad Medicine” category. There is no doctor in the original story, and the physician added to this version seems more helpful than prone to horrific experimentation. But it is a spirited adaptation of an early Lovecraft story that’s never been one of my favorites.

A hapless bicyclist is forced to take shelter in what he takes to be an abandoned house during a violent rainstorm. But the house isn’t empty; its inhabitant is a loathsome old man who has become obsessed by an illustration of cannibals in Filippo Pigafetta’s Regnum Congo (which is …read more

Source:: The Northlands

      

Bad Medicine: The Facts in the Case of M. Valdemar

By Kathryn L Ramage

Hypnotism booklet cover

The second episode in this Dark Adventure Radio Theatre anthology is based on Edgar Allan Poe’s story, The Facts in the Case of M. Valdemar, in which a doctor uses Mesmeric control over a dying subject to keep him in a sustained trance state–for months after death.

The episode is also kind of a DART rerun. A downloadable MP3 version of this audio drama was made available last fall, and I reviewed it then.

I’m not going to cover the unchanged parts of this episode again, but I’m going to note the differences.

As in the earlier version, the story has been transplanted to the 1930s, but the framing story with the radio interviewer is gone. Instead, Dr. Michael Quinlan (still Sean Branney) is facing an emergency hearing of the New York State Medical Board to review “purported breaches in ethical conduct” related to the experiment with the late M. Valdemar. The Board will decide whether or not to revoke Quinlan’s license based on its findings.

Dr. Quinlan has come prepared to account for himself; he offers the notes of the medical student Lionel (Jacob Andrew Lyle), who first accompanied him to attend Valdemar’s death-bed, as evidence. This leads into the first …read more

Source:: The Northlands

      

Bad Medicine: Cool Air

By Kathryn L Ramage

Sonia's notes

This special anthology episode of Dark Adventure Radio Theatre features three separate stories of “horrific healing” and medical science gone mad, two from H.P. Lovecraft and one from Edgar Allan Poe. I’m going to take them one by one.

The first is Cool Air, a Lovecraft story set in New York City during the 1920s. It’s about a Spanish doctor with an odd medical condition that requires him to keep his room very cold. You can read it online at http://www.hplovecraft.com/writings/texts/fiction/ca.aspx

The principal change in this audio adaptation is the sex of the first-person narrator. In Lovecraft’s story, he is unnamed and refers to himself as a “well-bred man”; here, she is a writer of pulp fiction named Sonia (after Lovecraft’s own wife, with whom he lived in Brooklyn for a couple of years in the 1920s).

When we meet Sonia Rudd (Sarah van der Pol), she and her husband Edwin (Andrew Leman) have fallen on hard times. She is nursing her feverish and desperately ill son; dialog indicates that the couple has already lost at least one other child and it doesn’t look like there’s much hope for this little boy. Sonia insists on keeping the room stiflingly warm. The …read more

Source:: The Northlands

      

Dark Shadows: The Rage Beneath

By Kathryn L Ramage

The Rage Beneath

This audio drama begins with Maggie Evans speaking, “I remember when it all started. Quentin Collins… came home, and brought the darkness with him.”

Her voice is interspersed with those of other characters–Quentin’s, Angelique’s–but the focus of the story’s introduction remains with Maggie as she summarizes the events of previous audio-plays in the Legend Reborn series, alluding to the “The Lost,” “Charlotte Howells,” and “the Professor and his army” (which settles my question of when the Christmas Presence occurs).

“But the day I’ll always remember,” Maggie concludes, “is the day the Collins family perished.”

She isn’t referring to the Collinses who disappeared mysteriously before this series began, but to those two who are still around: Quentin and Barnabas.

The story proper begins one evening in Collinsport just as it’s beginning to rain, with Quentin meeting up with Susan Griffin (who was one of the Lost souls in House of Despair, but she’s all better now). He offers to walk to the Blue Whale with her, even though he knows her husband Ed, the bartender, despises him; he doesn’t care.

While they are walking, the pair hears what sounds like masculine laughter and gruff voices singing the words of an old sea-chantey, …read more

Source:: The Northlands

      

The Testimony of Randolph Carter

By Kathryn L Ramage

Carter and Warren on the Gainesville pike

“I will not deny, though my memory is uncertain and indistinct, that this witness of yours may have seen us together as he says, on the Gainesville pike, walking toward Big Cypress Swamp, at half past eleven on that awful night. That we bore electric lanterns, spades, and a curious coil of wire with attached instruments, I will even affirm; for these things all played a part in the single hideous scene which remains burned into my shaken recollection. But of what followed, and of the reason I was found alone and dazed on the edge of the swamp next morning, I must insist that I know nothing save what I have told you over and over again.”

From The Statement of Randolph Carter

This is one of H. P. Lovecraft’s early macabre works, written in 1919. It’s a simple, very short story about two men who visit an abandoned cemetery to open up a crypt in the middle of the night. One goes down inside the crypt for reasons he has not made entirely clear to his companion, who remains above ground. The two continue to communicate via telephone equipment they’ve brought with them, and the man on the surface hears …read more

Source:: The Northlands

      

Storylandia 24, “Chassy” Now on Sale!

Where to buy: Amazon (eligible for free shipping) and Kindle.


Sample pages

Where to buy: Amazon (eligible for free shipping) and Kindle.

Chassy

“‘My Lord, they’re too close!’ A lady stood by herself at the stern of the SS Normandie looking at the ocean liner’s wake. The breeze coming off the Hudson River ruffled her long dark skirt and carried her anxious admonition across the promenade deck. A strand of blonde hair escaped her scarlet beret and waved against her cheek.

“Bridge Appleton, twelve years old, looked up from his book and stared at the lady’s silhouette, framed by the receding New York skyline as the Normandie made its way down the river toward Rockaway Point.”

Where to buy: Amazon (eligible for free shipping) and Kindle.

Help the Wapshott Press publish books that should be published! The Wapshott Press, publisher of Storylandia, is now a 501(c)(3) nonprofit. Tax deductible donations can be made here: Wapshott Press Donations and thank you so much for your support! (PS. Paypal takes zero commissions from your donation to the Wapshott Press.)

Storylandia 24, “Chassy” Now on Sale!

By Ginger Mayerson

Where to buy: Amazon (eligible for free shipping) and Kindle.

Sample pages

Where to buy: Amazon (eligible for free shipping) and Kindle.

Chassy

“‘My Lord, they’re too close!’ A lady stood by herself at the stern of the SS Normandie looking at the ocean liner’s wake. The breeze coming off the Hudson River ruffled her long dark skirt and carried her anxious admonition across the promenade deck. A strand of blonde hair escaped her scarlet beret and waved against her cheek.

“Bridge Appleton, twelve years old, looked up from his book and stared at the lady’s silhouette, framed by the receding New York skyline as the Normandie made its way down the river toward Rockaway Point.”

Where to buy: Amazon (eligible for free shipping) and Kindle.

Help the Wapshott Press publish books that should be published! The Wapshott Press, publisher of Storylandia, is now a 501(c)(3) nonprofit. Tax deductible donations can be made here: Wapshott Press Donations and thank you so much for your support! (PS. Paypal takes zero commissions from your donation to the Wapshott Press.)

…read more

Source:: Storylandia

      

Film Review: The Shuttered Room

By Kathryn L Ramage

The Shuttered Room

August Derleth is a somewhat ambiguous figure in the personal history of HP Lovecraft and his work. On the one hand, Derleth is the reason most people today are at all familiar with Lovecraft. If it weren’t for his Arkham House press keeping Lovecraft’s stories in print, they might otherwise have been lost to pulp horror obscurity. On the other hand, Derleth not only kept Lovecraft’s finished work alive, but contributed posthumous “collaborations” to what he called the Cthulhu Mythos, built on notes or fragments of story ideas Lovecraft left behind… and Derleth wasn’t the writer that Lovecraft was.

He’s not actually a bad writer–he could do some nicely creepy things with the lonely woods and lakes of Wisconsin–but he also had the nerdish need to categorize and rank his monsters. Even in his best stories, someone will pull out a checklist to try and identify the particular Elder God that’s causing all the trouble so it can be dealt with correctly. If nothing else, Derleth’s scope of vision is more narrowly focused than Lovecraft’s and his cosmic horrors aren’t indescribable beings barely comprehensible to the humans who encounter them, but tend to be a tad more localized.

The Shuttered Room is …read more

Source:: The Northlands

      

Blu-ray Review: The Mummy

By Kathryn L Ramage

Boris Karloff as The Mummy

Ancient Egypt has been on my mind for some time. It was the Dark Adventure Radio Theatre audioplay of Imprisoned with the Pharaohs that I reviewed last spring that made me think about going someday. Curse of the Pharaoh followed, as well as two different versions of Death on the Nile, and various Mummy movies from Hammer and Universal. Eventually, I worked my way back to original film–Universal’s The Mummy from 1932, starring Boris Karloff.

This movie was filmed in California with stock footage of the Valley of the Kings and back-screen projections of contemporary Cairo, but very few movies from the early sound era ever filmed on location. Its sets and settings are steeped with imagery and lore from ancient Egypt, though a lot of it is historically confused or fiction created specifically for this story–but one also expects a certain amount of mystical fabrication from a movie about a mummy that’s come back to life. What’s most interesting to me, however, is how little of this movie’s manufactured lore and story template are reused in the numerous sequels and remakes over the 85 years since it was made.

The Mummy begins with the British Museum …read more

Source:: The Northlands

      

Dark Shadows: The Christmas Presence

By Kathryn L Ramage

Christmas Presence

“Quentin Collins cordially invites you to spend Christmas in his company. On behalf of all those present here at Collinwood… I bid you welcome.”

It’s not the listeners of this audioplay Quentin extends this invitation to in his opening monologue–although, of course, we can feel free to drop in at Collinwood for the holidays too. The people he’s reaching out to, through means both commonplace and esoteric, are “those loyal to the Collins family” in Collinsport as well as “the missing members of our family” in hopes that they might be “reunited in the coming days.”

Quentin’s feeling sentimental as he plans an old-fashioned Christmas celebration, and the other inhabitants of Collinwood try to get into the holiday spirit to go along with him. Maggie Evans has come to cook the dinner and tries to get Barnabas (now voiced by Andrew Collins) to kiss her under the mistletoe. But even though he’s in a new body, Barnabas is still a vampire, and vampires don’t kiss; they just give hickeys. Angelique decorates a Christmas tree, and amuses herself with taunting Willie Loomis about how the townsfolk will come to blame him for the disappearance of their children.

A number of Collinsport children have been …read more

Source:: The Northlands